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Jewelry and other carvings I've done
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April 17, 2012
9:55 pm
SasQuatch9585
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Vampyre Mage had expressed a desire to see this stuff so here you go, girl.

Most of these pictures are quite bury, but you can see them well enough, I suppose.

 

skull-1.jpgskull-2.jpg

 

The pony tail is a 6 gauge.

 

pices.jpg

 

The thickest part of this one is a 0 gauge.

 

CBR-1.jpgCBR-2.jpg

 

The ring is made of oak, the bead is made of mahogany.  In the second picture you can see (barely) that I've carved a tongue-and-groove system to hold the bead in place.  This is a six gauge as well.

 

flatback.jpg

 

A 14 gauge flat-back.  Rather sharp.

 

mohagany-tunnels.jpg

 

These two tunnels are made of mahogany.  A cool idea, but they're so much rougher than anything else I carved, I never wore them.  All the jewelry you've seen so far, I carved completely by hand.

For this next one, I turned the basic shape on the lathe, including the concave back and convex front.  The spiral pattern in the center was done by hand.  I only made one of these.  It was really just a test to see how well the process would go.  My only regret is that I'm not stretched large enough to wear it.

Because it was just a test, I didn't try to make it any particular size.  I've never measured it, but I'd say it's about 1 1/4 inch.  It's made of alder and finished in teak oil.

 

spiral-plug-4.jpgspiral-plug-1.jpgspiral-plug-2.jpgspiral-plug-3.jpg

 

These next two pieces were also done completely by hand.

A simple key chain in alder and finished with shellack.  Because I'm Scottish and Irish, I thought this would be cool.

 

celtic-keychain.jpg

 

And this one is also carved in alder.  My first attempt at carving wood (no kidding), it really has no function at all.  The front is a design I came up with for a former friend of mine.  She's Irish and a pagan, hence, the Celtic pentacle.  She wanted a Celtic pentacle as a tattoo, but rejected this design.  I later created a much better one, but didn't carve that one into wood.  The edge is a simple Celtic key pattern.  The back is a capital Q of my own design.

Because I spell my nickname (SasQuatch) with a giant Q, the letter Q has become an abbreviation for my nickname; sort of an initial.  Birthday and holiday cards from my friends are often addressed only with a large Q.

pentacle-disc-front.jpgpentacle-disc-front-and-edge.jpgpentacle-disc-edge.jpgpentacle-disc-back.jpg

Sometimes I wonder if I can say anything in less than a hundred words.
April 17, 2012
10:32 pm
strommer
Portland,OR
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awsome work thanks for sharingSmile

April 18, 2012
12:47 am
DutchessOfNill
Wenatchee, WA
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You are talented!!  Awesome work!!

April 18, 2012
1:36 am
vampyremage
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Wow, those are very impressive.  Nicely done.

April 18, 2012
10:26 am
Chris Carter
Pennsylvania
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Thanks a lot for sharing! You're definitely on to something and I hope you keep with it, and keep us updated with your progress.

Church of Body Modification, President

April 19, 2012
1:27 am
SasQuatch9585
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Thanks for the support.

I certainly will be keeping this community up to date on my progress.  Especially because this community is my primary customer base.  And while I wouldn't dream of doing any direct advertising on this site (too much like spam, and I believe there's a unique hell waiting for spammers, lol) I do hope to generate a bit of word-of-mouth support once I get it all up and running.

Sometimes I wonder if I can say anything in less than a hundred words.
April 19, 2012
11:06 am
indi
Eden, NC.
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yep, i'm jealous.

these are pretty damn groovy.

April 19, 2012
11:10 am
Jamesryan
Utica, USA
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Hot damn. Once I get settled in, I'm going to have to get out to where you live and learn a thing or two! I'm stoked for you to get things back in order so you can do this again.

James R. Somers ModernPrimitivism.com
April 19, 2012
10:44 pm
UnholyResonance
Seattle, Washington
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These are gorgeous.

I've wanted to learn how to do some of this for sometime, but never sat down and really took the time to learn it all.

Maybe it'll be something I learn someday.

Thanks for sharing and for the muse :3

"Welcome Friends, Romans, and Circus Freaks to the generation in circuitry."
May 29, 2012
7:02 pm
SasQuatch9585
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So, I finally got myself a decent digital camera.  Here are some pictures of some of the same pieces and a few others I didn't bother including last time.  The detail this camera captures really shows the dust that has accumulated on these pieces.  I should have been more careful to clean them first, but oh well.  Here they are.

 

skull-ear-weight-face.jpgskull-ear-weight.jpg0g-ear-weight.jpg6g-cbr.jpg14g-flatback.jpgspiral-plug.jpgceltic-keychain.jpgpentacle-disc-edge.jpgpentacle-disc-back.jpgpentacle-disc-front-and-edge.jpgpentacle-disc-front-closeup.jpgpentacle-disc-back-closeup.jpg

 

And the stuff I didn't take pictures of before:

These are 9/16" tunnels made from solid maple and finished with block oil.

These are 14g spikes carved by hand (not on the lathe) from maple.  The longer one is finished with shellack, the shorter one is unfinished.

 

These claws are 6g, carved from maple and finished with clear acrylic.

 

This is my right ear, showing the jewelry I'm wearing now.  The second claw here is the same design, but 10g.  The dark spot on the larger claw is actually a minor flaw in the wood grain, which I feel gives character and uniqueness to the piece (as though being the only set of it's kind isn't unique enough).

These are the 1/2" plugs I used to wear.  Made from solid walnut and finished with clear acrylic.

 

Finally, these are the 1" plugs I made for another CoBM member, James Ryan.  Also made from solid walnut, also finished with clear acrylic.  The logo for James' website, ModernPrimitivism.com is burned into the surface.  The basic shape is the same as the 1/2" plugs above, but the slight convex shape is less exaggerated, and the ring around the outside is also burned.

There is an obvious difference in the color of these last two sets of plugs.  I found that the acrylic finish tends to turn yellow over time, though I'm not sure if it's the result of exposure to sunlight or exposure to skin oils

I do know that it is not the result of the acrylic breaking down or degrading in any way because this 1" set is nearly as old as my 1/2" set, but these have never been worn, and have seen almost no sunlight at all.  Also the yellowing effect on my 1/2" set is even across all surfaces.  If it were the result of exposure to skin oil, I assume it would be much more significant on the wearable surface and less significant on the front surface.

Either way, the color change adds a luster to the wood that I find very appealing.

Sometimes I wonder if I can say anything in less than a hundred words.
May 29, 2012
7:49 pm
strommer
Portland,OR
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way better pics looks awesomeSmile 

May 29, 2012
8:36 pm
Sommersett
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Why would you carve around the edge that touches ear?  I have 1 inch lobes and that seems really uncomfortable!!  Have you tried wearing this style?  The work looks beautiful and I am proud of you for making a goal and then going for it!

Everyone has something to say about the Mona Lisa until you're standing in front of it speechless.
May 30, 2012
3:34 am
Oakbear
UK
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Brilliant work sir!

"The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. But no price is too high to pay for the privilege of owning yourself." - Nietzsche
May 30, 2012
7:27 am
Kevin_cook
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I second Oakbear's praise … very nice

 

I am a woodworker / turner with 40+ years of experience … I cannot come close to this level of mastercraftsmanship … I know master works when I see them (www.dicecollector.net/PPW) … and these are masterworks

- Kevin Cook Proudly modified since 1983
May 30, 2012
12:50 pm
SasQuatch9585
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Wow, Kevin…Just, wow.  Thanks for that.

Thank you all for your support.

 

Sommersett, the pentacle disk is not intended as jewelry.  It's about 4" across and it's just a piece of alder I started working on one day to see if I could carve wood.  It's actually my first attempt at carving wood and had no intended purpose at all.

 

I don't know what happened with my last post, but every place it says "Forum" there's supposed to be a picture, so I'll upload them the right way here.

 

concentric-circle-maple-tunnels.jpg

These are 9/16″ tunnels made from solid maple and finished with block oil.

 

14g-spikes.jpg

These are 14g spikes carved by hand (not on the lathe) from maple.  The longer one is finished with shellack, the shorter one is unfinished.

claws.jpg

 

These claws are 6g, carved from maple and finished with clear acrylic.

 

left-ear.jpg

This is my left ear, showing the jewelry I’m wearing now.  The second claw here is the same design, but 10g.  The dark spot on the larger claw is actually a minor flaw in the wood grain, which I feel gives character and uniqueness to the piece (as though being the only set of it’s kind isn’t unique enough).

 

half-inch-plugs.jpg

These are the 1/2″ plugs I used to wear.  Made from solid walnut and finished with clear acrylic.

 

Modern-Primitivism-plugs.jpg

Finally, these are the 1″ plugs I made for another CoBM member, James Ryan.  Also made from solid walnut, also finished with clear acrylic.  The logo for James’ website, ModernPrimitivism.com is burned into the surface.  The basic shape is the same as the 1/2″ plugs above, but the slight convex shape is less exaggerated, and the ring around the outside is also burned.

There is an obvious difference in the color of these last two sets of plugs.  I found that the acrylic finish tends to turn yellow/orange over time, though I’m not sure if it’s the result of exposure to sunlight or exposure to skin oils.

I do know that it is not the result of the acrylic breaking down or degrading in any way because this 1″ set is nearly as old as my 1/2″ set, but these have never been worn, and have seen almost no sunlight at all.  Also the yellowing effect on my 1/2″ set is even across all surfaces.  If it were the result of exposure to skin oil, I assume it would be much more significant on the wearable surface and less significant on the front surface.

Either way, the color change adds a luster to the wood that I find very appealing.

Sometimes I wonder if I can say anything in less than a hundred words.
June 1, 2012
12:47 pm
Tiffany Hahn
San Diego, CA
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Truly amazing pieces! You are a gifted artist!

Tiffany M. Hahn ☆ CoBM Minister
IAM: TMHahnBodyMod.orgFacebookTwitter
June 4, 2012
11:36 pm
SasQuatch9585
USA
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Thanks Tiffany.

And thanks again to everyone for the kind words.  Now if I can just get everything situated so that I can do this for a living…

Sometimes I wonder if I can say anything in less than a hundred words.
June 5, 2012
7:43 am
Kevin_cook
Colorado
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Would you care to give any advice to the us (I know of 2) woodturners? … I really like your lathework

- Kevin Cook Proudly modified since 1983
June 5, 2012
12:35 pm
SasQuatch9585
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When I bought my lathe I also purchased an instructional video called "Turning Wood" with Richard Raffan.  There was also a companion book which supposedly went into more detail, but I have always been a more visual learner, so I just went for the video.

This video covers all the basic skills needed to turn wood accurately, including how to sharpen your chisels and how to stand and move properly.  It also provides simple exercises to practice cutting the basic shapes.  Then the video goes on to show how to turn a bowl and a small round box with a lid.  Almost everything I know about turning wood comes from this video, as I am fairly new at it.

Work with the exercises he gives you.  Pick up some inexpensive wood and do it over and over again.  Try them on different scales, making the details smaller and smaller, until you can repeat the shapes very consistently on any scale.  And be patient.  Don't try to rush the work.  I found that trying to work as quickly as he does in the video leads to failure, at least on my part.  I suppose I'll be able to work that quickly when I've got 10 or 20 years of experience at it.  For now, I just focus on moving steadily and fluidly.

One thing he said in this video when turning the small box…when opening up the inside of the box he starts from the outside edge and works inward.  This tends to leave a conical peak in the center of the piece.  He said that, like many people, he often finds it difficult to remove that peak so he tends to make a decorative feature of it.

I found that I could completely remove this peak by starting in the center of the piece and working my way out.  As he said in the video, you want to start at the outside edge and work inward to avoid tearing out the outer edge of the bowl/box, so I don't carry the cut all the way out to the edge.  Just start in the center and work your way out about half or 3/4 of the way, then detail the outside edge from the outside in.

Richard Raffan has made a lot of other books and videos, some of which go into greater detail on particular projects.  I recommend the one I purchased very highly, and I have a great deal of confidence that his other resources are equally valuable.

Sometimes I wonder if I can say anything in less than a hundred words.
June 5, 2012
1:41 pm
Kevin_cook
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LOL .. I have been turning off an on for about 40 years … and have even met Richard Raffin

 

I was just looking for pointers when it comes to doing guaged woodturnings

- Kevin Cook Proudly modified since 1983
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