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Neodymium Implants, Florida?
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July 12, 2013
12:40 am
mikemow95
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Hi, I don’t know if I’m on the right forum but I am in need of help. I am looking for someone in the Tampa Bay area of Florida that can do a magnetic implant in the ring finger, if anyone knows of a place that does this please let me know. From what I gather it is a new thing.

July 12, 2013
10:56 am
mkabala
Charlotte, NC
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I don't know of anyone specifically in the Tampa, FL area, but some piercers will do it. The important thing is to make sure that the magnet is properly coated. I got my magnet from SuperMagnetMan.com. I performed the implant myself, but I would not recommend doing that unless you have done a lot of research on your own and are aware of the risks involved. If you are in the Charlotte, NC area please look me up. I'd be glad to help in any way I can. You could also go to the Steve Haworth site and see if he will be in the Tampa area any time soon.

July 12, 2013
12:12 pm
Oakbear
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Hi mikemow95, welcome to the forum. I'm afraid i don't know any modification artists in your area, but if you are willing to travel there are plenty who offer this procedure, and as mentioned some who travel.

mkabala – That site has some interesting bits! What magnet did you go for and how did you perform the procedure?
The only people i know of who supply magnets manufactured as suitable for implantation are Steve Haworth or Samppa Von Cyborg. Both of whom use silicone coating, with a neodymium core as other forms corroded the magnet after time and led to complications previously.
I'd be interested in hearing more about your implant, research and decision process.

"The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. But no price is too high to pay for the privilege of owning yourself." - Nietzsche
July 15, 2013
11:51 am
mkabala
Charlotte, NC
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@Oakbear, I got the Disc – D1005A magnet. This magnet was actually added to inventory at the request of someone from the biohack.me forum. It is a 1mm thick x 3mm diameter disk magnet optimized for implanting in the finger. N52 refers to the magnet's strength. It is greater than that of most magnets, producing a strong magnet in a small size. The best feature about this magnet is its Parylene C coating, which is superior to the silicone coating used on Steve Haworth's original magnets. Parylene C is a microscopic coating applied via vapor deposition. This results in a surface that completely closes all gaps, preventing contact between the magnet and the body tissue in which it is implanted. It was gaps in the silicone coating that caused Haworth's initial magnets to fail.

I performed the procedure using a Z-series X-Acto knife and superglue. I covered the tabletop I was using with sterile gauze and thoroughly washed both hands. I soaked the magnet and knife in 91% alcohol prior to the procedure. I started out by placing a few ice cubes inside a plastic sandwich bag and allowing them to melt to the point where the ice was surrounded by water. I then applied this ice bag to my finger tip until the pain from the cold subsided and the surface of the finger tip became numb. I wiped the area with a sterile alcohol wipe. Then I made as small an incision as possible with the X-Acto knife, using the tip of the knife to make a pocket in the skin for the magnet. The target position was just below the subcutaneous fat and just off-center to the finger to allow using the finger for gripping without the magnet interfering. The pocket went far enough into my finger that I was able to close the incision without having to worry about the magnet coming back out. I used a toothpick to push the magnet in place, taking care not to touch the tip of the toothpick with my hand. This posed a greater risk of infection, but got around the problem of the magnet clinging to the tool.

Once the magnet was in place, I wiped my finger with sterile gauze, squeezed the incision closed, and applied superglue over the cut, taking care not to get superglue inside the wound. I held the cut closed while the glue dried. The bleeding was much less than I expected due to the use of the ice. I placed a second magnet on my skin to keep the implanted one in place. After the superglue dried, I applied a Band-Aid.

I removed the magnet the following morning to allow blood to reach the skin just over the implant. Aftercare included keeping the incision closed with superglue, reapplying as necessary, and then applying antibiotic ointment and a fresh Band-aid. This regimen was repeated twice daily for 10 days.

The implant has been in for months now. The wound has completely healed and the skin around it has returned to normal.

In hindsight, I would recommend using a sterile, single-use scalpel instead of the X-Acto blade. The Z-Series blade was definitely sharp enough, but the risk of infection is much greater. Sterile scalpels can be purchased online without a medical or veterinary license. I would also recommend applying betadine solution to the are of the incision prior to making the incision. It is what they use in the doctor's office and much better than alcohol for sterilizing the skin.

July 16, 2013
8:38 am
Oakbear
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Thank you so much for sharing that, it was very informative.
I have been interested in the Parylene c coating for a while, as it seems promising, but no modification suppliers use it as yet.

As you note your sterility was lacking, but all ended well. If you, or indeed anyone, would like advice on improving sterility in procedures feel free to ask. It sounds like you have some ideas for next time though. :)

"The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. But no price is too high to pay for the privilege of owning yourself." - Nietzsche
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